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BULLETIN 



Ham MMitijgton (Allege 

of the 

Untottsttg of ^irjitiia 



I 









Summer Quarter 
1944 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 
Vol. XXX JanUary, 1944 No. 1 



Mary Washington College 

of THE 

University of Virginia 

A Member of 

The Association of American Colleges 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools 

The Southern Association of Colleges for Women 

The American Association of Teachers Colleges 

The Association of Virginia Colleges 

The National Association of Business Teacher-Training 

Institutions 



Entered as second-class matter April 1, 1924, at the Post Office at Fredericksburg, 
Va., under Act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103 Act of 
October 8, 1917, authorized December 3, 1938. 



BULLETIN 



Marg Washragton College 

of the 

Umwrsittt of Virginia 




Summer Quarter 
1944 



The WOMAN'S COLLEGE of the UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Published in January, April, June and October 



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SUMMER QUARTER 

1944 

First Term begins Monday, June 12 

First Term ends Saturday, July 15 

Second Term begins Monday, July 17 

Summer Quarter ends Saturday, August 19 

Everyone — man, woman, and child — in the time of our country's 
greatest emergency, is anxious to do his or her part to help 
win the war and, although all of us cannot be in the front lines, 
there are many important and indispensable jobs we can fill 
if we are properly prepared. 

We believe that recent high school graduates, young 
women who are now in college, and teachers will find it most 
advantageous to continue their studies this summer and thus 
better prepare themselves for the urgent tasks and heavy re- 
sponsibilities that confront all of us. 

For many years, Mary Washington College has been on 
the four-quarter plan, with the summer quarter an integral 
part of the college year. This plan is particularly helpful now 
since' it is easy to adapt the college facilities to meet the 
national emergency and the Three-Year Degree Program out- 
lined in detail in this Bulletin, in addition to offering the nec- 
essary courses for those desiring to renew or raise certificates 
or to do additional work toward a diploma or degree. 

Of course, the Three-Year Degree Program is entirely 
optional and students still may enter, as heretofore, at the 
beginning of any quarter, and take three or four years to 
complete the requirements for a degree. Now is the time to 
secure a college education. No one knows what the future will 
bring. In any event, the chances are that the opportunity to 
secure college training will not be as favorable again for 
many years. 



WHY GO TO COLLEGE? 

Statistics show that in normal times the majority of 
women are absorbed in homemaking, teaching, or secretarial 
positions. However, at present practically every field is open 
to the well trained woman, and her opportunities for service 
have been greatly broadened and are almost unlimited. Fur- 
thermore, from all indications, college women will continue 
to occupy very important positions in the professions, busi- 
ness, scientific and technical fields in the post-war world. 

A college education is possible for anyone who has the 
ability, ambition, and determination to secure it, and is in- 
dispensable to a fully rounded life. Entrance into the profes- 
sions and many businesses and vocations is now gained only 
by way of the college. 

The average modern young woman desires not only a 
broad cultural education, but to be trained to enter the pro- 
fessional or business world. Therefore, she should choose the 
institution which will prepare her best both for taking her 
place in the complicated social structure of today and for her 
chosen specialized vocation or profession. 

In the average family, careful budgeting is necessary in 
order to make possible a college education and, therefore, the 
cost is of major importance. Yet, cost is not everything, and 
the facilities and advantages offered, the type of student body, 
the college atmosphere, environmental conditions, location, 
and many other features must be considered. 

Mary Washington has set for itself high standards of 
scholarship and high ideals and is not just another college. 
It is unique in name, location, and environment. The setting, 
campus, and buildings possess a singular charm and appeal 
seldom to be found — a place of beauty and dignity dedicated 
to the pursuit of truth and the way of honor. 

A college large enough to provide a liberal education but 
small enough to give personal attention to each student. 



THREE-YEAR DEGREE PROGRAM 
To Accelerate Training for Urgent Needs of the Nation 

Recognizing the acute need for trained leadership, the 
increasing demands for men and women trained in technical 
skills and the professions, and the consequent need for pre- 
paring them for such service at the earliest possible date, Mary 
Washington College, along with many other colleges in the 
country, has inaugurated a program which will enable students 
in any curriculum to complete the requirements for a degree 
in three years. 

The work for a degree at Mary Washington College can 
be completed in three years by attending three general ses- 
sions and three summer quarters. The summer quarter is only 
ten weeks in length, but carries the same credit as any other 
quarter due to the fact that classes meet six days a week. 
Furthermore, this quarter is divided into two terms of five 
weeks each, and a student may attend and receive credit for 
either one or both terms. There is a vacation period of four 
weeks between the close of the summer quarter and the be- 
ginning of the fall quarter. 

Increasingly large numbers of students all over the coun- 
try are eagerly taking advantage of the opportunity to com- 
plete their degree programs in three years in order to meet the 
pressing needs of our country. 

Enter College in June. — In keeping with the above pro- 
gram, it is expected that students who normally would enter 
college in September will enter in June, if possible, and com- 
plete one-third of a year's work this summer. 

Every advantage to entering college in September may be 
had by students matriculating in June, with many additional 
advantages, including economy in time and money since the 
summer quarter not only is the shortest quarter of the year 
but the least expensive. This plan also enables young profes- 
sional women to enter a productive occupation a whole year 
earlier. An entire summer of vacation may be justified during 
peace times but is a luxury few people can afford under pres- 
ent conditions. 

Students who attend the summer quarter will be given 
first consideration in such matters as rooms, accommodations, 
and financial assistance for the fall quarter and the remainder 
of the year. (See note on application blank in back of cata- 
logue.) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Accreditation Page 2 of Cover 

Dates of Summer School 3 

Why Go to College? 4 

Three-Year Degree Program 5 

Board of Visitors 7 

Officers of Administration and Assistants 8 

Officers of Instruction 10 

Demonstration and Student Teaching 19 

General Information: 

History of College 22 

Purpose 22 

Organization 23 

Location and Environment 23 

Historic Fredericksburg 24 

Social and Recreational Activities 27 

Field Trips and Tours 27 

Climate and Health 28 

Accessibility and Transportation 29 

Buildings and Accommodations 29 

College Recreational Center 33 

Other Facilities 33 

Administration: 

Expenses ■. . 36 

Student Aid and Loans 39 

Admission Requirements 39 

Directions for Registering 39 

Courses Offered 40 

Provision for Student Teaching, Demonstration and Observation 41 

Student Load 42 

Requirements for Diplomas or Degrees 42 

Degrees Conferred 43 

Placement Bureau 43 

Guests 44 

Radio Broadcasting Workshop 44 

Commerce, Business and Secretarial Science 45 

Departments of Instruction and Course Offerings: 

Art 49 

Commerce 50 

Dietetics and Home Economics 51 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 52 

Education 53 

Psychology and Philosophy 54 

English 55 

Library Science 56 

Foreign Languages 57 

History and Social Science 58 

Mathematics 61 

Music 61 

Physical and Health Education 63 

Science . . , 65 

Application for Admission Insert at End of Text 

College Views and Campus Activities. . Illustrations in Back of Bulletin 

Washington Shrines Illustrations in Back of Bulletin 



The Corporation of the University 



Legal Title : 
"The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia" 

THE RECTOR OF THE UNIVERSITY 
Robert Gray Williams 

THE VISITORS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

To February 28, 1946 

Lewis Catlett Williams Richmond 

James Howard Corbitt Suffolk 

Charles O'Conor Goolrick Fredericksburg 

Edward Clifford Anderson Richmond 

* Aubrey Gardner Weaver Front Royal 

To February 29, 1948 

Christopher Browne Garnett Arlington 

Robert Gray Williams Winchester 

Edward Reilly Stettinius, Jr Rapidan 

William Dandridge Haden Charlottesville 

The State Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, ex officio Richmond 

The President of the University, ex officio University 



Died March 10, 194 4. 



Officers of Administration and Assistants 



John Lloyd Newcomb, B.A., C.E., Sc.D., LL.D Chancellor 

Office of the President 

Morgan L. Combs, A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D President 

Estelle P. Derryberry, A.B Secretary 

Lake Cox, B.S Assistant Secretary 

Office of the Dean 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of College 

Virginia Dickinson Morgan, B.S Secretary 

Office of the Registrar 

Louis C. Guenther, A.B., M.A Registrar 

*Nannie Mae M. Williams, B.S., A.M Registrar 

Annabel C. Graves, A.B Assistant Registrar 

Pauline Lamason Secretary 

Office of the Treasurer 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S Treasurer 

Leon Ferneyhough Assistant Treasurer 

Adeline Kirkpatrick, B.S Chief Clerk 

Katherine Garrison Stenographer 

Jacqueline Burton Clerk 

Rebecca Yeaman Clerk 

Library 

Carrol H. Quenzel, B.S., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D.. . .Librarian 

^Bernard Fry, A.B., A.M Assistant Librarian 

Julia M. Lutz, A.B Assistant Librarian 

Margaret D. Dickinson, B.S., B.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Caroline Willis, B.A., B.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Dorothy N. Zenge, B.A., B.L.S Assistant Librarian 

Margaret A. Poorbaugh Clerk 

W. Edwin Hemphill, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Archivist 

•Absent on leave, military service, 1943-44. 



Mary Washington College 



Personnel Department 



Margaret Swander, A.B., M.S.. .Director of Student Personnel 
Eileen Kramer Dodd, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D Assistant 



Student Resident Department 

Mrs. Charles Lake Bushnell, B.A Dean of Women 

Lillie S. Turman, B.S Dean of Freshmen 

Mrs. Dice R. Anderson, A.B., M.A Supervisor of 

Off-Campus Students 

Mitchell F. Luck, B.S Secretary to Dean of Women 

Mrs. W. J. Young Hostess 

Mrs. William Derrow Hostess 

Mrs. Ronald W. Faulkner Hostess 

Faith E. Johnston, B.S., M.S Supervisor 

Home Management House 

Infirmary 

^Mildred E. Scott, B.S., M.D Resident Physician 

Mollie E. Scott, M.D Acting Resident Physician 

Elizabeth Trible, R.N Resident Nurse 

Susie Johnson, R.N Assistant Resident Nurse 

Edna Jones, R.N Assistant Resident Nurse 

Dining Halls 

Catherine Turner, B.S., M.A Administrative Dietitian 

Dalia L. Ruff Foods Purchaser and Assistant Dietitian 

Sara G. Taylor, B.S Assistant Dietitian 

Ora Haley Wood Assistant Dietitian 

Buildings and Grounds 

Eugene Curtis Supt. Buildings and Grounds 

Lillie S. Turman, B.S Director of Dormitories 

Thomas J. Honaker Manager of College Shoppe 

Geraldine Parry, B.S Dietitian, College Shoppe 



'Absent on leave, 1943-44. 



Officers of Instruction 



John Lloyd Newcomb, B.A., C.E., Sc.D., LL.D Chancellor 

A.B., College of William and Mary; C.E., University of Virginia; 
Sc.D., Washington and Lee University; LL.D, Duke University, 
College of William and Mary, George Washington University. 

Morgan L. Combs, A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D President 

A.B., University of Richmond ; A.M., University of Chicago ; Ed.M., 
Ed.D., Harvard University; Student, University of Berlin. 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean and Professor 

of Education 
B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Elizabeth W. Baker, A.B., A.M., Ph.D.. .Professor of English 
A.B., George Peabody College; A.M., University of Chicago; 
Graduate Student, Columbia University; Ph.D., George Peabody 
College. 

Louis J. Cabrera, A.B., M.A., Litt. D Professor 

of Spanish and Portuguese 
A.B., University of Dubuque; M.A., University of Maine; Litt. D., 
Andhra Research University, Vizianagaram, So. India; Graduate 
Student, Columbia University, University of Perugia, Italy, and 
University of Grenoble, France. 

IIobart C. Carter, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor 

of Mathematics 
B.S., Central Missouri State Teachers College ; M.A., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Missouri. 

William A. Castle, B.S., Ph.D .Professor of Biology 

B.S., Denison University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Roy Seldon Cook, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Oscar Haddon Darter, A.B., A.M Professor of History 

A.B., State Teachers College, Ada, Okla.; A.M., Columbia Univer- 
sity; Graduate Student, George Washington University, University 
of Michigan, and Peabody College; Travel and Study in Europe. 

Eileen Kramer Dodd, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor 

of Psychology 
Ph.B., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University; 
Student, Lehigh University, University of Pennsylvania, and Uni- 
versity of California. 

James Harvey Dodd, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Professor 

of Commerce 
Graduate, Accounting and Business Administration, Bowling Green 
Business University; A.B., Western Kentucky Teachers College; 
A.M., Ph.D., George Peabody College; Student, Vanderbilt Univer-. 
sity and Northwestern University. 



Mary Washington College 11 

Raleigh M. Drake, B.B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor 

of Psychology 
B.B.A., M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., University of London. 

Alice L. Edwards, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Professor 

of Home Economics 
B.S., Oregon State College; Graduate Student, University of Cali- 
fornia and University of Chicago; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity. 

*Charles H. Frick, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Professor 

of Mathematics 
B.S., University of South Carolina; M.S., Iowa State College; 
Graduate Student, University of Washington and Duke University ; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Paul Haensel, B.Com., LL.D., M.A., Ph.D Professor 

of Economics 
B.Com., Imperial Moscow Academy of Commerce, Moscow, Russia; 
LL.D., M.A., Ph.D., Imperial Moscow University, Moscow, Russia. 

Hugo Iltis, Ph.D Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of Prague; Student, University of Zurich. 

Alma C. Kelly, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Rutgers University; Student, New Haven School of Physio- 
theraphy; M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

John P. Kirby, B.A., Ph.D Professor of English 

B.A., Hamilton College; Graduate Student, Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Yale University. 

Almont Lindsey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

B.S., Knox College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

*Charles K. Martin, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor 

of Education 
A.B., Southwest Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., University 
of Missouri; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Charles George Gordon Moss, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.. .Professor 

of History 

B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.A., Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity. 

George Earlie Shankle, A.B., B.A., M.O., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 
A.B., M.O., Union University; B.A., Valparaiso University; M.A., 
Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

Milton H. Stansbury, A.B., Ph.D Professor of Spanish 

A.B., Brown University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

•Absent on leave, military service, 1943-4 4. 



12 Mary Washington College 



Rollin H. Tanner, A.B., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University; Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Reginald W. Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor 

of English 
B.A., M.A., McMaster University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Mary Jane Andrews, M.A Associate Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 
M.A., Columbia University; Graduate Student, Columbia University. 

Mildred McMurtry Bolling, A.B., A.M Associate 

Professor of French 
A.B., Colorado College; M.A., University of Missouri; Advanced 
Study, Paris; Graduate Student, University of Chicago and 
University of Colorado. 

Dorothy Duggan, B.S., M.A Associate Professor of Art 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A., in Fine Arts, Peabody Col- 
lege; Travel and Study in Europe; Student, Arts Students' League, 
New York City and Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. 

Eva Taylor Eppes, B.S., M.A Associate Professor of Voice 

Graduate in Piano and Harmony, Southern College; Graduate, 
Cornell University Music Department; Voice, Jean Trigg, Rich- 
mond, Helen Allen Hunt, Boston, Edouard Albion, Washington, 
D. C, Isador Luckstone, New York, Arthur Fickenscher, Univer- 
sity of Virginia; B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., University 
of Virginia. 

Ronald W. Faulkner, A.B., A.M Associate Professor 

of Music 
A.B., A.M., Colorado State College of Education; Institute of 
Musical Art, New York City; Pupil of George Barrere. 

E. Boyd Graves, A.B., A.M Associate Professor 

of Education 
A.B., A.M., College of William and Mary; Graduate Study, George 
Washington University. 

*Richard M. Kirby, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Commerce 
A.B., Berea College; A.M., Ohio State University; Graduate Stu- 
dent, University of Chicago; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Clifton B. McIntosh, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate 

Professor of Spanish 
A.B., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Frances Ramey Mooney, B.S., M.A Associate Professor 

of Social Science 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., George Peabody College; 
Graduate Student, Clark University, Columbia University, George 
Washington University, University of Southern California, Univer- 
sity of Chicago, and University of California. 



"Absent on leave, military service, 1943-44. 



Mary Washington College 13 

J. Kenneth Roach, A.B., M.A Associate Professor 

of Commerce 
A.B., Duke University; M.A., Columbia University; Student, 
Roanoke College, Cornell University. 

♦Mildred P. Stewart, B.S., M.A Associate Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., Columbia University; 
Student, Colorado State College, New School for Social Research, 
New York University, Bennington College. 

Catesby Woodford Willis, B.A., Ed. M.. .Associate Professor 
of Latin 
B.A., University of Richmond; Ed.M., Harvard University. 

George Warren Arms, A.B., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of English 
A.B., Princeton University; Ph.D., New York University; Student, 
University of Zurich and University of Munich. 

Mary C. Baker, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Assistant Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., and Ed.D., New York University; Student, University 
of Wisconsin. 

Richard H. Bauer, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of History 
Ph.B., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Chicago; Student, Luther 
Institute. 

Roy B. Bowers, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Psychology and Philosophy 
A.B., M.A., Carson and Newman College; Graduate Student 
Andover-Newton, University of Chicago and University of Cin- 
cinnati. 

Lucile H. Charles, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D.. . .Assistant Professor 
of Dramatic Arts 
Student, Theatre Guild School for Acting; Ph.B., University of 
Chicago; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Marion K. Chauncey, B.M., M.A.. Assistant Professor 

of Music 
Graduate, Georgia State Woman's College; B.M. and Violin 
Diploma, Ithaca Conservatory of Music; Student of Cesar Thomp- 
son — Belgian virtuoso, W. Grant Egbert, and Jean Pulikowski of 
the Cincinnati Conservatory; M.A., Degree and Supervisor of 
Public School Music Diploma, Columbia University. Graduate 
Student, George Washington University and Peabody Conserva- 
tory of Music. 

Estelle Pitt Derryberry, A.B Assistant Professor 

of Commerce 
A.B., Bowling Green College of Commerce; Graduate Student, 
University of Pittsburgh and Peabody College. 

♦Absent on leave, military service, 1943-44. 



14 Mary Washington College 

Katherine E. Griffith, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Wayne W. Griffith, A.B., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Harvard University; B.S. 
in L.S., Drexel Institute; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Sallie Baird Harrison, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Home Economics 
B.S., College of William and Mary; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

W. Edwin Hemphill, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant 

Professor of History 
B.A., Hampden-Sydney College; M.A., Emory University; Ph.D., 
University of Virginia. 

Anna Scott Hoye, A.B., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 
A.B., Lynchburg College; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 

Earl G. Insley, B.S., Ph.D • Assistant Professor 

of Chemistry 
B.S., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Student, University of 
Virginia. 

Faith E. Johnston, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Home Economics 
B.S., Kansas State Teachers College; M.S., Kansas State College; 
Student, Colorado State College. 

William Luther McDermott, B.A.S., M.A Assistant 

Professor of Art 
B.A.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.A., University of Pitts- 
burgh; Awards in Sculpture, Beaux Arts Institute of Design, New 
York. 

Mary E. McKenzie, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor 

of English 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Columbia University; Graduate 
Student, George Washington University. 

Leona B. Meece, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Commerce 
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Study, Bowling Green College of 
Commerce and LaSalle Extension University. 

Fred Earle Miller, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Commerce 
A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education. 



Mary Washington College 15 

*Earl G. Nicks, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Commerce 
A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education. 

Alan Stanley Peirce, A.B., M.S., Ph.D.. .Assistant 

Professor of Biology 
A.B., M.S., and Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Carrol H. Quenzel, B.S., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 
B.S., M.A., University of West Virginia; B.S. in L.S., University 
of Illinois; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Herman R. Reichenbach, Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Music 
University of Berlin; Ph.D., University of Freiburg. 

*Paul John Ritter, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor 

of Dramatic Arts 
A.B., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern 
California. 

Emil R. Schnellock Assistant Professor of Art 

Student, Art Student's League under Robert Henri and George 
Luks; Woodstock Art Colony, New York. 

Helen H. Schultz, B.S., A.M Assistant Professor 

of Biology 
Special Student, University of Chicago, University of Tennessee, 
Howard College, University of Colorado; B.S., A.M., George Pea- 
body College; Research Marine Biological Station, Woods Hole, 
Mass.; Graduate Study, George Washington University. 

Mildred Esther Scott, B.S., M.D Resident Physician 

and Assistant Professor of Hygiene 
B.S., M.D., University of Kansas; Staff, Kansas State Hospital; 
Samaritan Hospital, Troy, New York. 

Mildred Spiesman, B.A., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Health and Physical Education 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Columbia University; Student, 
New York University. 

Myrick Sublette, A.B., LL.B., A.M., Ph.D Assistant 

Professor of Commerce 
A.B., Indiana State Teachers College; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois; LL.B., University of Michigan. 

Margaret S wander, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Guidance and Counseling 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; Graduate Student, University of 
Pittsburgh; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Study, City of London 
Vacation School. 

* Absent on leave, military service, 1943-44. 



16 Mary Washington College 

Lola Minich Tompkins, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor 

of Commerce 
A.B., University of Oklahoma; Diploma, Gregg College, Chicago; 
M.A., New York University. 

Catherine Turner, B.S., M.S Assistant Professor 

of Home Economics 
B.S., Winthrop College; M.S., Woman's College of the University 
of North Carolina. 

*Arthuk L. Vogelbagk, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. Assistant 

Professor of English 
Ph.B., Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Harold Weiss, A.B., A.M Assistant Professor 

of Dramatic Arts 
A.B., A.M., Colorado State College of Education; Graduate Student, 
George Washington University and University of Wisconsin. 

Winifred Templeton Weiss, B.S., M.A Assistant 

Professor of Commerce 
A.B., S.W. Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., Columbia 
University; Graduate Student, Columbia University. 

James Edwin Whitesell, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Assistant 

Professor of English 
A.B., Randolph Macon College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Martha Hardy Anderson, A.B., M.A.. . .Instructor in English 
A.B., Baylor College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Neda Bine, B.S., Ed.M Instructor in Commerce 

B.S., Wesleyan College; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh. 

*William Brennand. .Instructor in Violincello and Contrabass 
Pupil of Joseph Emonts; Asst. First 'Cellist, National Symphony 
Orchestra; Member Pro Musica Quartette. 

Robert F. Caverlee, A.B., Th.B., Th.M., D.D Instructor 

in Biblical Literature 
A.B., University of Richmond; Th.B., Th.M., Southern Theological 
Seminary; D.D., University of Richmond. 

*Thomas Cousins Instructor in Brass Instruments 

Pupil of William Vachianno, Juilliard Conservatory; National 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Margaret D. Dickinson, B.S., B.L.S Instructor 

in Library Science 
B.S., Mary Washington College; B.L.S., Library School, George 
Peabody College. 



•Absent on leave, military service, 1943-44. 



Mary Washington College 17 

♦Bernard Fry, A.B., A.M Instructor in Library Science 

A.B., A.M., Indiana University; Graduate Student, Vanderbilt 
University. 

Emilie Gaither, B.A., M.A Instructor in Commerce 

Student, University of San Antonio and Texas A. and M. College; 
B.S., University of Texas; M.A., Columbia University. 

♦Robert L. Gasser, B.S Instructor in Brass Instruments 

B.S., University of Denver; Studied with Byron D. Jolivette at 
Denver College of Music and Loyd D. Geisler, National Symphony; 
Member, National Symphony Orchestra. 

Veda Brice Gibson, B.S., M.A Instructor in Commerce 

B.S., Winthrop College; M.A., New York University; Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago. 

♦Sidney Hamer Instructor in Violincello and Contrabass 

Solo 'Cellist with Kosloff Imperial Russian Ballet; Washington 
String Quartet; Russian String Quartet; Cleveland Symphony; 
Washington Symphony; studied with several of the world's fore- 
most 'Cellists. 

Lyle S. Hiatt, B.S., B.A Instructor in Commerce 

B.S., B.A., University of Florida; Graduate Student, University of 
Florida, Georgetown Law School, American University, George 
Washington University. 

Levin Houston, III, B.A Instructor in Piano 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute; Graduate Student, Washington 
and Lee University; Pupil of Ray Lev, Thorvald Otterstrom, Hans 
Earth, Guy Maier, Quincy Cole, and Harold Genther; Composer of 
distinction; Soloist. 

Charlotte Klein, Mus.D., F.A.G.O Instructor in Organ 

and Piano 
Mus.D., Boguslawski College of Music, Chicago; Fellow of the 
American Guild of Organists; Scholarship-Diploma Graduate in 
Organ and Piano, Peabody Conservatory of Music; Pupil of Widor 
and Phillip at Fontainebleau, France; National Vice-President and 
Musical Adviser, Mu Phi Epsilon, National Music Honor Society. 

Helen Marie Lundgren, B.M.E Instructor in Brass 

Instruments 
B.M.E., Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois; Member, National 
Symphony Orchestra; Trumpet pupil of Renold Schilke, Chicago 
Symphony. 

Julia M. Lutz, A.B Instructor in Library Science 

A.B., University of West Virginia; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University, University of West Virginia. 



* Absent on leave, military service, 1943-44. 



18 Mary Washington College 



Sylvia Meyer, B.A Instructor in Harp 

B.A., University of Wisconsin; Artist Diploma and Teachers Cer- 
tificate, Peabody Conservatory of Music; Pupil of Carlos Salzedo; 
Solo Harpist, National Symphony Orchestra. 

Geraldine Parry, B.S Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland; One year internship, Johns Hopkins 
University. 

Vera Neely Ross, B.M ! Instructor in Voice 

B.M., University of Kansas; fellowship Juilliard Musical Founda- 
tion; Graduate School, New York; Pupil Madame Choen-Rene, 
Walter Golde, and Oscar Seagle; Soloist, Washington, D. C. 

Mollie E. Scott, M.D Instructor in Health Education 

M.D., College of Physicians and Surgery, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Jane Scranton, B.S., M.S Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Hood College; M.S., Cornell University. 

Millard Taylor, B.M Instructor in Violin 

B.M., Eastman School of Music; Pupil of Gustave Tinlot and Wil- 
liam Kroll; ConcertmasteT, National Symphony Orchestra. 

Elizabeth Trible, R.N Instructor in Home Nursing 

Mary Washington College; Stuart Circle Hospital, School of 
Nursing, Richmond; Student, School of Nursing, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

William Russell Walther Instructor in Riding- 
Director, Oak Hill Stables. 

Hope D. Wells, B.A., B.S Instructor in Health Education 

B.A., B.S., University of Wisconsin. 

V. Louise Whitlock, B.S., M.S Instructor in Commerce 

B.S., Oregon State College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

^Donald Ransom Whitney, A.B., A.M Instructor 

in Mathematics 
A.B., Oberlin College; A.M., Princeton University. 

♦Nannie Mae M. Williams, B.S., A.M Instructor 

in Psychology 
B.S., Mary Washington College; A.M., George Washington Uni- 
versity. 

Dorothy Ziegler, B.M Instructor in Brass Instruments 

B.M., Eastman School of Music with Performer's Certificates in 
trombone and piano; Member of Stokowski Youth Orchestra, 
Koussevitsky Berkshire Music Center Orchestra and National 
Symphony Orchestra. 

^Absent on leave, military service, 1943-44. 



Mary Washington College 19 

Demonstration and Student Teaching 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of College and Director of Teacher-Training 

Fredericksburg Public Schools 

Guy H. Brown, A.B Superintendent of City Schools 

A.B., Roanoke College; Study, University of Virginia. 

Robert Carrington Vaden, Jr., A.B., M.A. Director 

of Instruction 
A.B., College of William and Mary; M.A., University of Virginia. 

Gladys Marian Alrich, B.A., M.A Supervisor 

B.A., M.A., Stetson University; Study, University of Virginia. 

Katharine Micks Bernard, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Lucy Steptoe Blackwell, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Farmville State Teachers College. 

Elizabeth Faulkner Brent, B.A., M.A Supervisor 

B.A., Hollins College; M.A., Columbia University; Study, Mary 
Washington College. 

Alice Barrett Conway, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., University of Missouri; Study, Henderson State Teachers 
College, Conway State Teachers College. 

Elizabeth Stone Courtney Supervisor 

University of Virginia; Columbia University; Mary Washington 
College. 

Leslie Marguerite Crumley, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Herman R. B. Dally, B.S., M.A Supervisor 

B.S., M.A., Ball State Teachers College. 

Catharine Ida Dawson, A.B., B.S., M.A Supervisor 

A.B., University of Richmond; B.S'., Mary Washington College; 
M.A., Middlebury College; Study, University of Maryland. 

Alice Perkins Dew, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Carolyn Dalton Dickenson, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Dorothy Dickinson, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., College of William and Mary. 

Emma Owens Euliss, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Nannie Walker Goodloe, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 



20 Mary Washington College 

Mary Virginia Gouldman, B.A Supervisor 

B.A., College of William and Mary; Study, Mary Washington 
College. 

Laura Frances Harris, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Farmville State Teachers College; Study, University of 
Virginia. 

Goldie Sager Harvey, B.S., M.A Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Josephine Boswell Inskeep, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Ethel Barrowman Jones, B.A., B.S Supervisor 

B.A., Dickinson College; B.S., Richmond Professional Institute. 

Kathryn Jones, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Kate Judy Keckler, B.A Supervisor 

B.A., Western College; Study, Mary Washington College. 

Alma Keel, B.A Supervisor 

B.A., Fredericksburg College; Study, Mary Washington College. 

Edith N. Kellar Supervisor 

Man> Washington College. 

Josephine Reasor Laningham, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Mildred Jamison Lapsley, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Mary Baldwin College; Study, University of Virginia. 

Nell Gertrude Lemley, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., West Virginia University. 

Frances Josephine Liebenow, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Pauline McGhee Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

Genevieve Moseley, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Farmville State Teachers College. 

Ethel Hester Nash, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Study, University of Virginia, 
Columbia University. 

Virginia Nash Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

Robert Bruce Neill, B.S., M.S Supervisor 

B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Study, Mary Washing- 
ton College, University of Virginia. 

Elnora Mary Overley, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 



Mary Washington College 21 



Anne Marye Owen, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Flora MacDonald College; Study, College of William and 
Mary; University of Virginia, University of North Carolina. 

Deborah White Owen, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Winthrop College; Study, Mary Washington College. 

Willie Gertrude Payne, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Winthrop College; Study, Duke University. 

Lillian Toombs Poff, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., University of Virginia. 

Lorene Moffette Potter, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Mary Decker Pugh, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., University of Richmond; Study, Mary Washington College; 
Crozer Theological Seminary. 

Loula Williams Rawlings Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

Helen Reynolds Reamy, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Study, Columbia University. 

Esther Rowe, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Margaret Elinor Rowell, A.B., M.A Supervisor 

A.B., Lynchburg College; M.A., Peabody College. 

Katy Friel Sanders, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Peabody College; Study, Farmville State Teachers College, 
Stout Institute. 

Arthur H. Schwartz, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Stout Institute; Study, University of Tennessee. 

Florence Baptist Scott, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Helen Florence Shelton Supervisor 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Farmville State Teachers College. 

Sarah Calvert Spillman, B.S., M.A Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Emeline Lee Stearns, B.A., M.A Supervisor 

B.A., University of Richmond; M.A., University of Chicago; Study, 
Cornell University, Harvard University. 

S. Elizabeth Truitt, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Farmville State Teachers College; Study, College of William 
and Mary. 

Nancy Elma Wilson Supervisor 

Radford State Teachers College; University of New York. 

Lydia Hilldrup Wingo, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 



General Information 



History of the College 

Mary Washington is the Woman's College of the University 
of Virginia and is an integral part of the University system. The 
college became affiliated with the University by Act of the General 
Assembly of Virginia February 12, 1944, with the legal title "Mary 
Washington College of the University of Virginia" and is under 
the direct control of the Rector and Board of Visitors of the 
University. 

The name of the institution has real historical significance 
and background combined with intimate local associations, since 
the College is located on a hill overlooking the home and tomb of 
Mary Washington; the boyhood home of her illustrious son, 
George Washington; and Kenmore, the home of her daughter, 
Betty Washington Lewis, and the campus was at one time a part 
of the Lewis estate. No more appropriate name could have been 
given a woman's college, and it should serve as an inspiration to 
young womanhood and a standard of excellence for ages yet to 
come. 

The development of Mary Washington College has been 
phenomenal, especially during the past ten or twelve years. It is 
the largest college for women in the States, has a national 
reputation, and draws its students from almost every state of the 
Union, the territories, and some foreign countries. 

Purpose 

The purpose of the college is to provide for women educa- 
tional opportunities comparable to those provided for men in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia. 

Although originally the main purpose was that of educating 
teachers for the public schools, Mary Washington has developed 
into a distinguished liberal arts college. While the emphasis is 
upon the liberal arts, music, and the other fine arts, courses in 
Home Economics, Commerce, Physical Education, and other 
specialized fields are offered, and students entering in September, 
1944, will have ample time to complete any teacher-training cur- 
riculum and receive the B.A. or B.S. Degree in Education. 



Mary Washington College 23 

Organization 

As heretofore, and in keeping with the practices of some 
of the foremost colleges of the country, both terms of the sum- 
mer quarter are operated on the basis of six days a week. 
While this reduces the total time to ten weeks, the number of 
actual teaching days as well as the credit obtained are the 
same as in colleges operating on the eleven or twelve weeks 
basis. This saving of time is a distinct advantage to teachers 
in service and regular college students inasmuch as it gives 
them a longer vacation period before the opening of their 
schools or colleges than otherwise would be possible. 

Location and Environment 

Mary Washington College enjoys an enviable position among 
colleges of the country because of its ideal and strategic location 
amidst the finest traditions of Old Virginia, almost in the shadow 
of the Nation's Capital, and accessible to the great centers of cul- 
ture of the East. 

The environment is both inspiring and romantic because of 
its colorful past and the peculiar blending of the life of early 
Colonial days with the life of today in a manner to be found no- 
where else in America. Here you may spend your college days 
where you can look down upon the boyhood home of George 
Washington; the home of his sister; the home and tomb of his 
mother; and within a few minutes drive of Wakefield, his birth- 
place, and of Mount Vernon, the home of his mature years. 

The campus, comprising eighty acres, is situated on the famous 
Marye's Heights, overlooking the historic City of Fredericksburg, 
and commanding a panoramic view of the beautiful Rappahan- 
nock River Valley and was at one time a part of the estate of 
Betty Washington Lewis, sister of George Washington. The posi- 
tion of the buildings gives them a commanding appearance, bring- 
ing out in strong relief the classic beauty of the architecture. In 
the rear of the campus, deep wooded ravines threaded by crystal 
streams add a picturesqueness to the college grounds. The setting, 
campus, and buildings possess a singular charm and appeal seldom 
to be found. 

The stately colonial pillars, the rolling shady lawns, and the 
halo of golden memories which cluster about the place are vividly 



24 Mary Washington College 

reminiscent of the gracious charm, culture, and romance of the 
Old South. In these idyllic surroundings, college days pass all too 
quickly. 

Historic Fredericksburg 

Fredericksburg and vicinity have played an important 
role in every critical and momentous period of American His- 
tory from the time Captain John Smith and his intrepid fol- 
lowers sailed up the Rappanhannock River in 1608 until the 
present, and is aptly known as "America's Most Historic 
City." It is also frequently referred to as "George Washing- 
ton's Boyhood Home." On the heights where now stands Mary 
Washington College, once stood "Seacobeck," an Indian vil- 
lage, visited by Captain Smith and his party. 

No other community in the country had a more intimate 
association with or played a more conspicuous part in the 
political and historic growth of America than Fredericksburg. 
Perhaps no other similar area on the face of the earth can boast 
of such a brilliant galaxy of leaders and prominent men and 
women. 

If we should draw a circle around this ancient city within 
a radius of approximately forty miles, we would find within 
that narrow compass the birthplace of George Washington, 
James Madison, James Monroe, Zachary Taylor, Chief Justice 
John Marshall, the Lees of the Revolution, Patrick Henry, 
Henry Clay, Matthew Maury, Robert E. Lee and Bushrod 
Washington. All were prominently identified with Fredericks- 
burg and it was regarded as their home town. 

Fredericksburg furnished the Commander-in-Chief of the 
Army and the Admiral and Founder of the American Navy 
during the Revolutionary War, George Washington and John 
Paul Jones. In addition to the Commanders, it furnished six 
other Generals, Hugh Mercer, Thomas Posey, George Rogers 
Clark, William Woodford, George Weedon, and Gustavus 
B. Wallace. 

James Madison, President of the United States and Father 
of the Constitution, was born within twenty miles of the city. 
Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, wrote the "Act Establishing Religious Liberty in Vir- 



Mary Washington College 25 

ginia" in 1775, in Fredericksburg. This section of Virginia 
furnished the Presidents of the United States for thirty-two 
years during the most trying and difficult period of the history 
of the Republic. Fredericksburg was the home of James Mon- 
roe, President of the United States and author of the Monroe 
Doctrine. It was George Mason of an adjoining county who 
wrote the "Virginia Bill of Rights," and the "Constitution of 
Virginia." 

Here lived General Lewis Littlepage, protege of John Jay 
at the court of France, member of the Cabinet of the King of 
Poland, and emissary to Russia. His tomb is in Fredericks- 
burg. Other notable characters who were born or lived in 
Fredericksburg were John Forsythe, Governor of Louisiana, 
Minister to Spain, and Secretary of State ; Governor Alexander 
Spotswood of the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe; Chief 
Surgeon Laurens Brooke, who sailed with John Paul Jones 
on the "Ranger" and the "Bon Homme Richard"; Moncure 
D. Conway, famous writer; Commodore Theodore R. Rootes, 
Captain Joseph N. Barry, Commander George Minor, and 
Colonel Richard D. Maury, all of whom distinguished them- 
selves in the Confederate Navy ; Captain Thorn, Commander of 
the famous Merrimac in the battle of Hampton Roads ; Robert 
Brooke, Governor of Virginia and Attorney General ; John 
Taylor, United State Senator from Virginia, writer, and world 
famous agriculturist; and Gari Melchers, internationally 
known artist. 

Famous scientists include Matthew F. Maury, the "Path- 
finder of the Seas"; Captain Lynch, United States Navy, fa- 
mous for his scientific work in connection with the topography 
of the "Dead Sea Valley"; Rear-Admiral Griffin, Chief of 
Bureau of Naval Engineering and inventor of the electric drive 
and the turbine gear; and Tom Armat, who invented an im- 
portant phase of the motion picture, and whose patent was 
later purchased by Edison. 

Among the notable women from Fredericksburg were 
Susan Metcalf Savage, early missionary to Africa; Ellen 
Lewis Herndon, wife of President Chester A. Arthur; Martha 
Stevens of Civil War fame; Mary Washington, Mother of 
George Washington, whose tomb is in Fredericksburg; Mary 



26 Mary Washington College 

Custis, wife of General Robert E. Lee ; and Kate Waller Bar- 
rett, internationally known sociologist and educator. 

Space does not permit mentioning all of the famous men 
and women who were born in Fredericksburg or whose lives 
were closely associated with the community. 

The following are some of the places in full view of the 
college visited by thousands of people from all over America 
and from foreign countries, every year : The boyhood home of 
George Washington, where he cut the cherry tree ; the home 
and burial place of his mother; "Kenmore," the home of his 
sister, Betty Washington Lewis; "Chatham," so long associ- 
ated with romance and war, the headquarters of the com- 
mander of the Army of the Potomac, the favorite visiting place 
of George Washington; where Count Zeppelin, an attache of 
the Northern Army, sent up a balloon at the Battle of Fred- 
ericksburg for observation purposes. 

Also, the first Apothecary Shop in America ; the old slave 
block ; the home of Matthew Fontaine Maury ; the Rising Sun 
Tavern, built by Charles, the brother of George Washington ; 
National Cemetery, where sleep not less than 15,000 of the 
Northern heroes of the War Between the States who lost their 
lives on adjacent battlefields; Confederate Cemetery where 
rest the remains of 5,000 soldiers ; "Brompton," the headquar- 
ters for the Confederates ; "Greenway," General Burnside's 
headquarters ; Wallace Hill, where Lincoln reviewed his 
troops; the law office of James Monroe; historic Falmouth, 
the site of a prison camp during the Revolutionary War, and 
the home of the first millionaire in America. 

The old Sunken Road at the base of the heights in front 
of the college campus ; the Confederate Cemetery at the foot 
of the hill ; the breastworks and gun emplacements on the crest 
of the hill ; and the cannon balls and other relics that are found 
from time to time, constitute mute but eloquent testimony of 
the two sanguinary battles which were staged on the heights 
now occupied by the campus, during the War Between the 
States. 

The United States Government, has established a Battle- 
field Park in the Fredericksburg area, and has spent large 
sums suitably marking its battlefields — Chancellorsville, Wil- 



Mary Washington College 27 

derness, Spotsylvania Court House, Salem Church, and Fred- 
ericksburg. 

Considering its historical significance, and the fact that it 
is situated in one of the most accessible and cultural commun- 
ities in America, it would be difficult to find a more fitting 
place for a college or an environment more stimulating. Here 
the old and the new are happily blended into a progressive and 
interesting community of approximately ten thousand people, 
surrounded by historic shrines and crowned by a halo of 
golden memories capable of inspiring all who enter its gates. 

Social and Recreational Activities 

Mary Washington College has a full-time Director in 
charge of social and recreational activities. 

This program includes formal and informal entertainment 
of all types on the campus, lectures by well known speakers, 
historic tours, field trips, etc. 

It is believed that students are greatly benefited if they 
devote at least a part of their time to well planned recreational 
and social activities, field trips, and informal studies and pur- 
suits worthwhile within themselves. 

Pitts Lecture Fund. — Through the generosity of Mr. Ben- 
jamin T. Pitts, of Fredericksburg, a fund has been established 
for the purpose of bringing to the college prominent lecturers 
on national problems, international relations, and subjects of 
contemporary interest. 

Field Trips and Tours 

Every person who attends the summer session should, if 
possible, use some of her time to become better acquainted 
with the region in which the college is located. 

As an integral part of the program of instruction, the col- 
lege sponsors regular visits or pilgrimages to the many local 
shrines and places of interest and note, including those in the 
immediate vicinity of Fredericksburg, the cities of Washing- 
ton, Richmond, and other places accessible to the college. The 
heads of the various departments of instruction have charge 
of the tours. 



28 Mary Washington College 

Trips are arranged for the afternoons and Saturdays when 
they do not interfere with classroom work. The department 
head or teacher in charge of a group makes assignments in 
advance bearing on the particular places to be visited, so that 
students will be familiar with the history or events connected 
with any given place. In addition, a lecture covering the his- 
tory and significance of the particular place or shrine is given 
on the grounds. 

These trips are not confined to historic places alone, but 
include visits to industrial and educational institutions, as well 
as to Congress, State Legislature, Congressional Library, 
State Library, and other governmental departments in Wash- 
ington and Richmond. 

This phase of the program of studies is a rich education 
within itself, and furnishes students a background of informa- 
tion which not only enables them to appreciate our history and 
institutions, but which serves also as an inspiration. Students 
eagerly look forward to these trips and they serve to vitalize 
and motivate the work in history, art, music, science, com- 
merce, and in other departments of the college. 

Climate and Health 

Mary Washington College offers an ideal environment for 
summer study. A large portion of the campus is covered by a 
magnificent growth of native trees. Numerous shaded paths 
and driveways add to the pleasure and comfort of those who 
spend the summer here. 

The fact that it is located on the highest point in Tide- 
water Virginia and its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay and 
the ocean, insure cool breezes at all times. The summer days 
are seldom subject to extremes of heat, while the nights are 
delightfully cool. 

Not only the college, but the entire community has a su- 
perior health record. There is an abundant supply of pure 
water available at all times. The college infirmary, with resi- 
dent physician and nurses is available to students living in 
college residence halls without extra cost. 



Mary Washington College 29 

Accessibility and Transportation 

Because of its central location, midway between Wash- 
ington, D. C, and Richmond, and its excellent transportation 
facilities. Fredericksburg is one of the most accessible cities 
in Virginia. 

This college is nearer the Capital of the Nation and the 
Capital of the State than any other State college, which makes 
it possible for students to take advantage of the libraries, art 
galleries, theatres, and other educational facilities in Wash- 
ington and Richmond. 

Buildings and Accommodations 

Residence Halls 

All of the residence halls provide ample and comfortable 
housing facilities. Every room is an outside room with ample 
ventilation and light, single beds, built-in closets and book- 
cases, and hot and cold water. The six newer buildings afford 
every convenience and comfort — apartments, suites, a limited 
number of single rooms, private baths, circulating ice water, 
beautifully appointed drawing rooms, comfortable lounge 
rooms, large porches and arcades, pressing rooms, kitchen- 
ettes, shower baths, incineration, etc. 

Westmoreland Hall. — Named for a neighboring county, 
the birthplace of George Washington, Robert E. Lee, James 
Monroe, and many other prominent men whose names are 
interwoven with American History. This is the newest dormi- 
tory on the campus. 

Mary Ball Hall. — Named in honor of Mary, the Mother of 
George Washington. Her home and tomb, the home of her 
daughter, and the boyhood home of her illustrious son are in 
Fredericksburg and in full view of the campus. 

Mary Custis Hall. — Named in honor of the wife of Robert 
E. Lee, whose home was at Chatham, in Fredericksburg. 

Dolly Madison Hall. — Named in honor of the wife of 
President James Madison. The latter was born within twenty 



30 Mary Washington College 

miles of Fredericksburg, and his life was closely associated 
with the community. 

Virginia Hall. — Named for the Commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia. 

Frances Willard Hall.— Named in honor of Frances E. 
Willard, the great temperance leader and Christian scholar. 

Betty Lewis Hall.— Named in honor of Betty, sister of 
George Washington, whose home, Kenmore, is in Fredericks- 
burg and in full view of the campus. 

Cornell Hall. — Located on Cornell Street near the main 
entrance to the campus. 

Hamlet House.— Named in honor of the late William N. 
Hamlet, who was connected with the institution for thirty 
years. 

HOUSEKEEPING APARTMENTS 

Betty Lewis Hall, which is somewhat removed from the 
center of the campus, contains twenty-three furnished apart- 
ments, ranging from one to four-room suites, equipped for 
housekeeping. 

This building affords ideal accommodations for married 
couples or mature students who wish to live off the campus 
and do light housekeeping, but is near enough so that meals 
may be taken in the college dining halls, if preferred. 

Other Buildings 

George Washington Hall. — Administration building, com- 
pleted in 1939, named in honor of General George Washington, 
whose life was so closely associated with Fredericksburg and 
this immediate section of Virginia. 

This is the largest and most imposing structure on the 
campus and contains the administrative offices ; departmental 
offices ; a few classrooms ; music practice rooms ; and a broad- 
casting studio which is fitted with the best in recording equip- 
ment, and is wired directly to the local studio so that programs 
can be transmitted to State and National hook-ups. Other fa- 



Mary Washington College 31 

cilities include a speech clinic ; personality development clinic ; 
large recreation room ; and a roof garden. 

This building also contains an auditorium with a seating 
capacity of 1,624, dressing and make-up rooms, etc. The stage 
is fully equipped with the most modern devices for handling 
stage scenery and settings, and is planned to take care of the 
most elaborate programs. 

In addition, a fine pipe organ which is the generous gift 
of Mr. Benj. T. Pitts, of Fredericksburg, and a fully equipped 
projection room for the exhibition of motion pictures, are 
provided. 

E. Lee Trinkle Library. — This building was completed in 
1941 at a cost in excess of $225,000, and provides stacks and 
other facilities for 150,000 volumes. The Library contains five 
main reading rooms. Five floors of all-metal stacks house the 
general book collection. It also contains classrooms for instruc- 
tion in library science and the Mendel Museum, in addition to 
well-equipped offices and workrooms. 

The paneled Browsing Room with comfortable chairs and 
lounges and a large fireplace, the Periodical Room, and the 
Virgnia Room combine to make this one of the most delight- 
ful places at the college for relaxation and reflection as well 
as study. 

The Library is named in memory of the late E. Lee 
Trinkle, former Governor of Virginia and for many years 
President of the Governing Board of the college. 

In addition to the splendid college library on the campus, 
the Congressional Library and the Folger Shakespeare Li- 
brary in Washington, and the State Library and City Library 
in Richmond provide added opportunities for those interested 
in research. 

Monroe Hall. — Named in honor of President James Mon- 
roe, who lived in Fredericksburg and whose life was closely 
identified with the community. This building contains class- 
rooms; the little theatre, with a seating capacity of 632, 
equipped with pipe organ ; gymnasium ; and a few depart- 
mental offices. 



32 Mary Washington College 

Chandler Hall. — Science hall, named in memory of Alger- 
non B. Chandler, Junior, who was President of the college 
from 1919 until his death in 1928. 

The first unit of this structure was erected in 1928-29. 
During 1938-39 this building was completed, the first unit 
renovated, and the whole structure changed inside and out. 
The laboratories for home economics, dietetics, biology, bac- 
teriology, chemistry, and physics are located in this building 
in addition to a number of lecture rooms and classrooms, stu- 
dent and faculty lounge rooms, and the College Shoppe. 

Seacobeck Hall. — This building stands on the site of an 
Indian village of the Seacobeck tribe, visited by Captain John 
Smith and his party in 1608. This is one of the most beautiful 
buildings on the campus, and contains dining halls, kitchen, 
lounge room, etc. It is a large, airy, well-ventilated building, 
with the most modern equipment, including its own refriger- 
ation plant. 

Student Activities Building. — Built from contributions 
from the alumnae and other friends of the college. 

Infirmary.— This important unit of the college is located 
near the center of the campus, is well-equipped, and in charge 
of a full-time resident woman physician and three full-time 
trained nurses. 

Home Management House. — A home adjoining the col- 
lege grounds has been equipped to give seniors in home eco- 
nomics practice in every detail of housekeeping and home- 
making, in purchasing provisions, planning, cooking, and 
serving meals, cleaning and caring for the house, and keep- 
ing accounts. 

Central Power and Laundry Building. — This building 
contains the heating plant, transformers, and a well-equipped 
steam laundry. A large greenhouse, covering almost the entire 
top of this building, adds much to the facilities of the Depart- 
ment of Biology and, in addition, furnishes flowers for the 
college. 



Mary Washington College 33 

Amphitheatre. — Located on the natural slope of a hill in 
the midst of a dense grove of trees. Has a seating capacity of 
approximately 1,800, a large stage, dressing rooms, and a spe- 
cially designed lighting system. 

Cabin. — A rustic camp, including cabin, with stone fire- 
place, electric lights, running water, and all conveniences, situ- 
ated on a high hill, in a remote section of the campus, over- 
looking the recreational grounds. 

President's Home. — Located on an eminence just south of 
the main campus, overlooking the City of Fredericksburg. 

College Recreational Center 

In the midst of the National Battlefield Park, not far away yet 
seemingly miles from the bustle of the city, is situated a large tract 
of wooded land filled with streams, ravines, wild flowers, and wild 
life. This tract is the gift of Mrs. W. N. Hamlet and her husband, 
the late Professor Hamlet, to the college, and is to serve as a mem- 
orial to both of them. 

Trails will be made and timber cut in preparation for cabins, 
recreational halls, etc., as soon as conditions will permit. The 
place is to serve as a recreational center for the college, as well as 
an arboretum, a wild flower preserve, and a game sanctuary, 

Other Facilities 

This is a delightful place in which to spend one's college 
days. The social and recreational opportunities and facilities 
are unexcelled — spacious campus, beautiful groves, two roof 
gardens, large recreation halls, commodious indoor and out- 
door swimming pools, picturesque golf course on campus, 
amphitheatre, sound motion pictures, tennis courts, gymna- 
sium, athletic fields, saddle horses, rustic camp with cabin in- 
cluding all conveniences, and farm within easy distance of the 
college on which cabins, a large recreational hall, and other 
facilities are being erected. In addition, there are formal re- 
ceptions and dinners, teas, formal and informal entertainment, 
tours, etc. A delightful home atmosphere adds to the content- 
ment and happiness of the student body. 



34 Mary Washington College 

College Shoppe — The College Shoppe is located in Chandler 
Hall, and is a combination store and tearoom. The tearoom sec- 
tion contains a large soda fountain and serves plate lunches, 
sandwiches, etc. The store section handles lal books and class- 
room supplies, an extensive line of college jewelry, cosmetics, 
room decorations, and other accessories. 

The red and black leather booths around the walls, the lunch 
tables in the center, the radio and nickelodeon, and the privilege of 
dancing there with approved dates on designated evenings, all go 
to make this a popular meeting place for students and faculty alike. 

Riding. — At Oak Hill Stables, located just west of the col- 
lege near historic Plank Road, a clubhouse has been built con- 
sisting of a clubroom, which is used for lectures, rainyday 
activities, informal college parties, picnics, etc., a dressing 
room, and other necessary facilities. This clubhouse is sur- 
rounded by spacious grounds and numerous shaded bridle 
paths, and is convenient to the new stable of saddle horses 
and a large riding ring. 

The Riding Club sponsors four horseshows a year, three 
small shows and a large show in the spring. 

Sports. — If you desire instruction in swimming, diving, 
life saving, golf, tennis, archery, horseback riding, or other 
recreational activities, or wish to improve your technique and 
skill in these sports, you will find here excellent facilities and 
expert instruction. 

Training Schools 

The college is fortunate in having located almost at its 
front door the splendid schools of the City of Fredericksburg, 
which are used for student teaching, observation, and demon- 
stration work by the college through a cooperative program. 

The city school plant is large, modern, well-equipped, and 
has a staff of experienced and well trained instructors. In addi- 
tion to classrooms and laboratories, the buildings contain an 
auditorium with a seating capacity of 1,000, gymnasium, cafe- 
teria, workrooms, and an excellent library which affords a 
wide range of reading and study material for both students 



Mary Washington College 35 



and supervisors. The school grounds are provided with a sta- 
dium and ample playground facilities. 

Post Office 

The new College Station, a branch of the Fredericksburg 
Post Office, locted just across the street from the main cam- 
pus, was established largely for the convenience of Mary 
Washington College. Similar service is provided here as is 
found at the main post office in the city. 

Mary Washington Hospital 

The Mary Washington Hospital, a private institution, 
located in the City of Fredericksburg and convenient to the 
college, is well equipped and in charge of a splendid staff of 
specialists. Here students may secure the services of widely 
recognized physicians and surgeons in cases of severe illness 
or emergencies. 



Administration 



Expenses for Summer Quarter 

First Term Second Term 

General fees— Virginia students $18.00 $18.00 

Board, room, laundry, medical service. 36.25 36.25 

The above amounts cover all necessary living expenses, 
such as meals, furnished room in dormitory, light, laundry, 
infirmary, medical service, and entertainment. 

Tuition. — No tuition fee is charged residents of Virginia. 
Non-residents of Virginia add $10.00 a term additional for 
tuition or $20.00 a quarter. 

Medical and Infirmary Fee. — Students not living in col- 
lege residence halls are entitled to the services of the college 
medical and nursing staff upon payment of a medical fee of 
$1.00 a term (or $2.00 for the summer quarter), payable in 
advance, which covers ofTce calls and treatment for slight ill- 
nesses or minor accidents. In case of confinement to the In- 
firmary, there is an additional charge of $1.00 a day, payable 
on leaving the Infirmary, to cover board and room service. 
Off-campus students not living in their own homes will find 
this service indispensable. 

Part-Time Students 

Anyone not desiring to carry a full schedule may enter as 
a part-time student, and register only for the course or courses 
desired, with or without credit. 

For students carrying less than five quarter hours of work 
a term, the charge is $10.00 for not over three quarter hours 
of credit, and $13.00 for four quarter hours of credit. 

Those who wish to attend the summer session without 
credit and take advantage of the opportunity to live in a col- 
lege atmosphere, observe demonstration and class activities, 
use the college recreational facilities, and become better ac- 
quainted with the historic section in which the institution is 



Mary Washington College 37 

located, may do so without the necessity of attending classes 
regularly or being responsible for the preparation of required 
work. In this case, matriculation and college entrance fees will 
be reduced proportionately. 

Laboratory Fees 

The fees to be paid for laboratory courses are indicated in 
connection with description of these courses in another part 
of this catalogue. Laboratory fees cover the cost of materials 
and laboratory service furnished. These fees are due at the 
time of registration. 

Books and Supplies 

Books and supplies are available at the College Shoppe. 
These cannot be included in a student's college account but 
must be paid for in cash at the time of purchase. 

Fee for Use of Radio 

Radios may be installed in dormitory rooms upon receipt 
of a permit from the Dean of Women. Their use is subject to 
avoidance of annoyance to others living in the dormitory. No 
outside aerials will be permitted, and the wiring must be ap- 
proved by the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. A 
charge of $1.00 a quarter is made to cover the cost of oper- 
ation. 

Degrees, Diplomas, and Certificates 

Degrees and diplomas are furnished graduates at $7.50 for 
a degree and leather case, and $3.00 for the professional or 
secretarial diploma. No charge is made for a certificate. 

Credit 

No degree, diploma, or certificate will be granted or a 
transcrip of credits furnished a student until all financial obli- 
gations to the college, other than student loans, have been 
paid. 

All previously incurred expenses at the college must be 
fully paid or secured before a student may re-enter at the 
beginning of any quarter. 



38 Mary Washington College 

Refund of Fees 

In case of withdrawal from college within ten days after 
registration, general college fees will be refunded pro rata 
with the exception of $5.00 to cover cost of registration, and 
charge for room and board will be prorated for the actual time 
in residence, 

After ten days, and before the middle of the term, general 
college fees and living expenses will be returned pro rata. 

In case of withdrawal after the middle of the term, except 
for personal illness and upon recommendation of the college 
physician, no refund of fees will be made. 

No refunds will be made to students whose connection 
with the college terminates on account of disciplinary action. 

Withdrawal 

Board will be refunded to students withdrawing from col- 
lege temporarily only in case it is necessary to withdraw for a 
period of two weeks or longer on account of personal illness, 
evidenced by a certificate from the attending physician, or for 
a family emergency of which the President is informed and 
which he approves as an emergency. 

A student on "campus" who withdraws during this period, 
except for imperative reasons approved by the President, will 
be recorded as suspended. 

Dormitory Rooms 

Students, except those living at home and attending as day 
students, are required to live in the college dormitories. 

The dormitory rooms are completely furnished with single 
beds, dressers, study tables, chairs, bookcases, and built-in 
closets. 

The student is expected to furnish four sheets, two pillow 
cases, bed spreads, towels, napkins, soap, and other articles 
desired. 

Each dormitory is equipped with kitchenettes and pressing 
rooms, and positively no cooking, storage, or serving of food, 
or the use of electrical appliances, is permitted in dormitory 
rooms. Any student violating this rule will be asked to relin- 
quish her room. 



Mary Washington College 39 

Checks for college expenses should he made payable 
to Mary Washington College. 

Students are held responsible for damages, breakage, 
or loss of college property. 

Student Aid and Loans 

Student aid positions and loans are available to a limited 
number of worthy students who are unable to meet their full 
expenses during the summer quarter. Application should be 
made to the President. 

Admission Requirements 

The college admits to its summer quarter the following 
classes of students : 

(a) Graduates of accredited public and private high 
schools. 

(b) Those who pass the State college entrance examina- 
tions. 

(c) Students transferring from other standard colleges. 

(d) Persons over twenty years of age who are not grad- 
uates of accredited high schools but have had success- 
ful teaching experience, and wish to continue college 
programs leading to a diploma or to a degree, may 
register as special students until the deficiencies in 
high school credits have been made up . 

(e) Those who are not interested in diploma or degree 
but wish to pursue some particular course or courses 
may register as special students. 

Directions for Registering 

An application blank will be found in the back of this 
catalogue. On receipt of this blank properly filled in a room 
will be reserved. 

A student's room reservation will be held only through 
registration days, unless the college is requested to hold it 
longer because of late entrance resulting from an emergency. 



40 Mary Washington College 



Courses Offered 

As stated elsewhere, the summer session is an organized 
integral part of the college year, and the work done during this 
quarter carries full credit toward diploma or degree. 

The course offerings for the summer quarter are approxi- 
mately the same as for the general session and meet the 
present needs of (a) high school graduates who desire to be- 
gin work in their chosen field in June instead of waiting until 
September, and thus save much valuable time; (b) the ever- 
increasing number of students regularly enrolled in college 
who desire to make up some required work or to continue their 
studies in the summer in order to complete the requirements 
for a degree in three years or less; (c) teachers in service who 
desire to renew or raise certificates or to take additional work 
toward a diploma or degree. 

In addition, teachers and others qualified may take special 
courses, with or without credit, and graduates of standard 
four-year colleges or holders of the Collegiate Certificate can 
complete the Education courses required for the Collegiate 
Professional Certificate. 

Wartime Courses 

In accordance with its program of adjustment to war 
needs, the college has organized a number of new courses. 
Attention is called particularly to the instruction nOw offered 
in Spanish, Portuguese, German, the History of Latin Amer- 
ica, and World Geography. Other new courses include Intro- 
ductory Geology ; Astronomy, Maps, and Weather ; General 
Astronomy ; Applied Psychology ; and Psychological Problems. 

Additional emphasis is being placed on mathematics, 
chemistry, and physics for those interested in these fields. 

All departments are endeavoring to relate instruction to 
current problems and events wherever feasible. 

Department of Commerce. — Intensive courses in short- 
hand, typewriting, accounting, and office practice are available 
during the summer quarter. In accounting classes, attention is 
given to taxation and tax reports. 



Mary Washington College 41 

A special effort is being made to give specific preparation 
to prospective workers in government service. Detailed in- 
formation in regard to civil service appointments is available 
at the college. 

Department of Physical and Health Education. — This de- 
partment is giving definite collegiate training for physiothe- 
rapy technicians, recreational directors, and first aid in- 
structors. 



Teachers Urgently Needed 

Teachers are urgently needed. There are excellent oppor- 
tunities for former teachers or qualified persons who have 
never taught. The War Manpower Commission has charac- 
terized teaching as a valuable contribution to the war effort. 
Attendance at the summer session at Mary Washington Col- 
lege will afford an opportunity to prepare for a vitally needed 
and satisfying type of war service. 

Special provision is being made in the summer quarter for 
the re-training of teachers who, after an absence from the pro- 
fession, wish to return during the war emergency. The courses 
offered are designed to acquaint former teachers and other 
interested persons with new materials of instruction, current prac- 
tices in directing learning, and present day challenges to the school. 

Provision for Student Teaching, Demonstration and 
Observation 

A very important phase of a teacher's training is the con- 
tact with actual school situations during her college career. 
The City of Fredericksburg cooperates with the college in 
providing training school facilities for observation, demon- 
stration, and student teaching for summer school students. 

The Fredericksburg High and Elementary Schools are 
housed in a large, modern, and well-equipped plant located 
within a short walking distance of the campus. The buildings 
contain lecture rooms, classrooms, an auditorium, gymnasium, 
cafeteria, work rooms, laboratories, and library. The school 
grounds are provided with a stadium and ample playground 
facilities. 



42 Mary Washington College 

In addition to actual teaching assignments, demonstration 
classes in the use of modern curricula in all types of schools 
and under varying conditions, and opportunities for class ob- 
servation are provided. Those who desire to do student teach- 
ing during the sumer session should communicate with the 
Dean of the College at the time application for admission is 
made. 

Student Load 

Courses aggregating eight quarter hours of credit a term or 
sixteen hours of credit for the quarter are considered a normal 
load. 

A student may carry courses aggregating as much as nine 
quarter hours of credit a term or eighteen quarter hours of credit 
for the quarter provided : 

(a) Courses aggregating forty-five quarter hours of credit 
were passed in the regular session of the college last 
attended with an average not below "C" or the equi- 
valent; or 

(b) Courses aggregating eighteen quarter hours of credit 
were passed in a standard college the preceding sum- 
mer, making a total of at least forty-five quarter hours 
of college credit with an average not below "C" or 
the equivalent ; or 

(c) A student needs this additional credit to graduate this 
summer; or 

(d) A student holds a degree from a standard college. 

Those taking work for renewal of certificates may com- 
plete the requirements in one term. For detailed information 
in regard to renewal of certificates write to the State Depart- 
ment of Education, Richmond, Virginia. 

Requirements for Diplomas or Degrees 

At least one year of residence (three quarters ) here is re- 
quired for a degree or diploma. The candidate must be regis- 
tered as a student in the college at the time the work for a 
degree is completed. 



Mary Washington College 43 

Not more than one-fourth of any curriculum leading to a 
degree or a diploma may be taken in extension classes or by 
correspondence. Students working toward a degree or a di- 
ploma should consult the Registrar before enrolling in a cor- 
respondence course. 

A minimum of 189 quarter hours of credit is required for 
the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in any 
field, and 93 quarter hours of credit for the two-year diploma 
for elementary teachers or for the secretarial diploma. 

An average of "C" is required for a degree or diploma. 

Degrees Conferred 

Mary Washington College confers the Bachelor of Arts 
and the Bachelor of Science degrees in the arts and sciences, 
and the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees 
in Education. 

The curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
Education and the Bachelor of Science degree in Education 
are designed for prospective teachers, and the holder of one 
of these degrees is eligible for the Collegiate Professional Cer- 
tificate—the highest certificate issued by the Virginia State 
Board of Education. 

However, a student may pursue work for the A.B. or 
B.S. degree and still qualify for the Collegiate Professional 
Certificate by electing sufficient courses in Education, since 
the chief difference in the curricula leading to the various 
degrees is in the constant requirements such as languages, 
mathematics, or science. 

*Two-Year Secretarial Diploma. — Completion of the first 
two years of the commercial or business curriculum qualifies 
one for the secretarial diploma. 

Placement Bureau 

The Placement Bureau is a clearing house for graduates, 
well qualified students who are seeking positions, and school 
boards, superintendents and others who are in need of teachers 
or workers and specialists in various fields. Superintendents, 



'Will not be awarded after June, 1946. 



44 Mary Washington College 

members of school boards, and others interested are invited 
to visit the college, to make use of the Placement Bureau, and 
to meet applicants. Where this is not possible, confidential 
reports giving a full and accurate estimate of each applicant 
will be furnished on request. 

The College Placement Bureau is unable to meet the de- 
mands for secretaries, business workers, dietetians, teachers 
and specialists in various field. 

Guests 

Students entertaining guests in the college dining halls are 
charged fifty cents for each meal. The crowded condition of the 
dormitories makes it inconvenient to have over-night guests. It is 
not best for guests or parents to request over-night entertainment 
in students' rooms therefore. 

Graduates or former students of the college are always wel- 
come, and are not charged for meals or accommodations for a 
period not exceeding two days. Those who remain for a longer 
period may secure meals and room accommodation at the rate of 
$2.00 a day. Due to the very limited facilities available for guests 
in the dormitories, it is requested that the Dean of Women be 
notified in advance of a contemplated overnight visit to the col- 
lege by an alumna. 

Radio Broadcasting Workshop 

The importance of radio as an educational and socializing 
agency is generally recognized today. With the development of 
community broadcasting stations, opportunities in the field of radio 
have increased tremendously. 

Aside from the vocational aspects, there is a decided interest 
in the development of a good radio "presence" on the part of edu- 
cators, civic and club leaders, and interested people in general. 
In fact, the wide use of radio for education, entertainment, and 
advertisement today makes a pleasing radio presence and voice 
highly important and almost a vital necessity. Courses in public 
speaking alone are not sufficient for modern needs. 

In maintaining a radio broadcasting workshop, Mary Wash- 
ington College is endeavoring to meet this demand for a worth- 



Mary Washington College 45 

while service to that ever increasing number of young people and 
adults who are interested in radio either as a vocation or an avoca- 
tion. Complete broadcasting studios and a control room with the 
most modern and complete equipment are located in George Wash- 
ington Hall. There are direct wires to Station WFVA, a Blue 
network station, and the radio control room is also wired to the 
stage of the auditorium, to the roof garden, and to the ballroom 
in George Washington Hall. Opportunities are thus provided for 
audience reaction to programs that are broadcast and for radio 
and broadcasting experiences of many different types. 

Studio conditions at the college are similar to those of a typical 
broadcasting station, so that every phase of radio work from con- 
trol room monitoring and operation, to dramatic, speech, and 
musical work before the microphone, are studied and experienced. 
The latest type of recording mechanisms enable the prospective 
speaker or artist to hear himself just as others hear him, and also 
to study in detail the effect of the program that has just been re- 
hearsed. Special attention is given to the development of a pleas- 
ing and effective radio speaking voice, as well as experience in 
many other types of radio work. 

Courses in radio broadcasting are open to all students. 

Commerce, Business and Secretarial Science 

This college has one of the strongest departments of Com- 
merce in the country, has achieved a national reputation in 
this field, and is a member of the National Association of 
Business Teacher-Training Institutions. 

The courses are designed : 

1. To prepare teachers of commercial or business sub- 
jects. 

2. To meet the needs of those who desire a broad busi- 
ness education. 

3. For those who wish to prepare for secretarial or other 
positions with the government or in business. 

4. For those who desire to prepare to become technical 
secretaries to private physicians, dentists, directors 
of laboratories, and other similar positions. 



46 Mary Washington College 

Commercial Teaching. — The Curriculum for commercial 
teachers leads to the Bachelor of Science Degree and the Col- 
legiate Professional Certificate— the highest certificate issued 
by the Virginia State Board of Education. 

Training for Business Degree Course. — Upon completion 
of the degree course in commerce graduates are qualified 
either to enter the teaching profession or business, as prefer- 
ence or circumstances may determine. 

Only those who wish to become teachers are required to 
take practice teaching and professional courses in Education. 

Short Secretarial Courses. — The program of studies in- 
cludes a short course in Commerce to meet the needs of stu- 
dents who desire to acquire sufficient knowledge in this field 
during the summer to qualify them to hold business positions. 
This course embraces shorthand and typewriting, and if de- 
sired, elementary bookkeeping, English, or other selected sub- 
jects. Due to the intensive period of training, the same amount 
of skill can be secured in these subjects here during the sum- 
mer quarter of ten weeks as ordinarily would require three 
months or longer. It is not necessary to have had previous 
business training in order to take this short course. 

A two-year curriculum is offered also for students de- 
siring to train for business positions who do not find it con- 
venient to remain in college for a degree but desire more 
advanced training in commercial subjects and a broader edu- 
cational background. 

Completion of the first two years of the Commercial or 
Business Curriculum qualifies one for the Two- Year Secre- 
tarial Diploma. 

If, at a later date, such students desire to secure a degree 
in commerce, the college credit obtained for work taken in the 
office preparation course may be applied directly without loss 
of credit. This cannot be done when courses are taken in a 
private business school not accredited by the State Board of 
Education. 



Mary Washington College 47 

There are other reasons in addition to the matter of credit 
why it is to the interest of future office workers to take their 
training in a standard accredited college. Among these are the 
advantages of living in a college atmosphere amidst cultural 
surroundings, with the privilege of enjoying college life and 
college activities, to say nothing of the difference in cost. 

Technical Secretarial Course. — Secretarial training com- 
bined with biological training enables one to become an effi- 
cient secretary and technician. This program leads to the 
Bachelor of Science degree, and is designed to prepare young 
women for the position of secretary to private physicians, 
dentists, directors of laboratories, directors of public health 
agencies, and other similar positions. 

The secretarial training is given under the direction of the 
Department of Commerce, and consists of typewriting and 
shorthand, involving technical terminology, principles of eco- 
nomics, accounting, and office practice and management. The 
technical work is given by the Departments of Science and 
Dietetics and Home Economics, and consists of work in zool- 
ogy, physiology, botany, chemistry, physics, bacteriology, bio- 
chemistry, home nursing, and child care. Opportunities for 
practice in office laboratory routine are provided in the col- 
lege infirmary and offices of private physicians. 

The course is flexible, permitting substitutions wherever 
individual needs or circumstances dictate. 



Departments of Instruction and 
Course Offerings 



Summer 1944 



The work of the college is organized into fifteen major 
departments and divisions, as follows : 

Art 

Commerce, commercial teaching, business, and secretarial 

Dietetics and Home Economics 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 

Education 

Psychology and Philosophy 

English, Journalism 

Library Science 

Foreign Languages 

History 

Social Science (political science, sociology, economics and 

geography) 
Mathematics 
Music 

Physical and Health Education 
Science 

^Course offerings are listed under these headings in the 
above order on the pages that follow. 

Course Numbers. — In the courses described below, those 
numbered 100-199 are first year courses ; 200-299, second year ; 
300-399, third year ; and 400-499, fourth year. 

.The college reserves the right not to offer certaia of the 
courses listed below if fewer than five students are enrolled. 



♦Complete descriptions of the courses listed will be found in the 
general catalogue. 



Mary Washington College 49 



ART 

Art 101. General Art. Four double periods a week for first term. 
Two credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art H101. General Art. Six double periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 102. General Art. Four double periods a week for first term. 
Two credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 103. General Art. Four double periods a week for second term. 
Two credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 210. Art Appreciation. Six periods a week. Three credits. Of- 
fered each term. Fee, $1.00. 

Art 211. Figure Sketching and Composition. Prerequisite: Art 101 
or equivalent. Six double periods a week for first term. Three credits. 
Fee, $2.00. 

Art 212. Advanced Figure Sketching and Composition. Six double 
periods a week for second term. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 213. Advanced Figure Sketching and Composition. Six double 
periods a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 218. Photography. Four double periods a week for first term. 
Two credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 219. Advanced Photography. Prerequisite: Art 218 or equiva- 
lent. Four double periods a week for second term. Two credits. Fee, 
$3.00. 

Art 224. Commercial Art. Prerequisite: Art 101 or equivalent. Six 
double periods a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Art 225. Advanced Commercial Art. Prerequisite: Art 224 or equiv- 
alent. Six double periods a week for second term. Three credits. Fee, 
$3.00. 

Art 232. Modeling. Six double periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 312. Home Decoration. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 315. Crafts. Six double periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Art 323. Costume Design. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 331-332-333. Mural Painting and Composition. Six double pe- 
riods a week. Offered each term. Three credits each term. 

Art 340-341-342. Studio Practice: Sculpture. Six double periods a 
week. Offered each term. Two credits each term. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 422. Art Appreciation, Architecture, and Sculpture. Six periods 
a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Art 423. Art Appreciation, Painting. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 



50 Mary Washington College 



Art 424. Art Appreciation, American Art. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Art 431-432-433. Studio Practice: Oil Painting. Six double periods 
a week. Offered each term. Two credits each term. Fee, $2.00. 

COMMERCE 

Commerce 111. Shorthand. Six double periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

Commerce 112. Shorthand. Six double periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

Commerce 113. Shorthand. Six double periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

Commerce 121. Typewriting. Six double periods a week for first 
term. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 122. Typewriting. Six double periods a week for second 
term. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 123 . Typewriting. Six double periods a week for first 
term. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 133. Office and Secretarial Practice. Prerequisite: type- 
writing speed of thirty-five net words per minute. Two single and four 
double periods a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 201. Accounting. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

Commerce 202. Accounting. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

Commerce 203. Accounting. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

Commerce 211. Shorthand. Six double periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

Commerce 212. Shorthand. Six double periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

Commerce 213. Shorthand. Six double periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

Commerce 221. Typewriting. Six double periods a week for first 
term. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 222. Typewriting. Six double periods a week for second 
term. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 233. Advanced Office and Secretarial Practice and Man- 
agement. Prerequisite: Commerce 133. Two single and four double pe- 
riods a week for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 236. Advanced Correspondence Filing. Six periods a 
week for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 301. Advanced Accounting. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 



Mary Washington College 51 



Commerce 302. Advanced Accounting. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Commerce 303. Advanced Accounting. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Commerce 313. Intermediate Stenography. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. 

Commerce 401. Business Organization. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Commerce 402. Money and Banking. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

Commerce 413. Advanced Stenography, Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Commerce 426. Business Law. Six periods a week for first term 
Three credits. 

Commerce 427. Business Law. Six periods a week for second term 
Three credits. 

Commerce 428. Marketing. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 



DIETETICS AND HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 101. Nutrition. Six periods a week for first term 
Three credits. 

Home Economics 102-103. Foods. Two single and four double pe- 
riods a week for first and second terms. Three credits each term. Lab- 
oratory fee, $4.00 each term. 

Home Economics 111. Textiles. Two single and four double pe- 
riods for first term. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Home Economics 112-113. Textiles and Clothing. Two single and 
four double periods for first and second terms. Three credits each term. 
Fee, $2.00 each term. 

Home Economics 223. Home Management. Four single and two 
double periods for first term. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Home Economics 241. Health of the Family. Six single periods for 
second term. Three credits. 

Home Economics 242. Child Study. Four single and two double 
periods for first term. Three credits. 

Home Economics 303. Food Service. Two single and four double 
periods for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 311-312-313. Home Economics for Elementary 
Teachers. Two single and four double periods for first term. Six single 
periods for second and third terms of course. Three credits for each term 
completed. Fee, $3.00 first term. 

Home Economics 320. Family Economics. Six single periods a week 
for first term. Three credits. 



52 Mary Washington College 



Home Economics 351. Quantity Cookery. Prerequisites: Home Eco- 
nomics 101-102-103, or equivalent. Four double and two single periods 
for first term. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 352. Experimental Cookery, Four double periods 
for second term. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 400. Home Management Residence. Prerequi- 
sites: Home Economics 223, 303, 421. Register in advance. Six credits 
for quarter. Fee, $4.00. 

Home Economics 403. Consumer Education. Four single and two 
double periods for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 413. Advanced Clothing. Two single and four 
double periods for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 421. Nutrition for the Family. Two single and 
four double periods for first term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 422. Child and Infant Nutrition. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 421. Four single and two double periods for second 
term. Three credits. 

Home Economics 423. Diet in Disease. Two single and two double 
periods for first term. Three credits. 

Home Economics 450. Supervised Practice in Institutional Manage- 
ment and Commercial Food Service. Six double periods a week for quar- 
ter. Register in advance. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 453. Problems in Nutrition. Six periods a week 
for first term. Three credits. 

Home Economics 450. Institutional Accounting and Records. Four 
double periods for second term. Two credits. 

Home Economics 461. Institutional Economics. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 351. Two single and four double periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

For Principles of Teaching Home Economics and Supervised Teach- 
ing for vocational home economics education students, see pages 53-54. 



DRAMATIC ARTS AND SPEECH 

Dramatic Arts 

Dramatic Arts 331. History of the Theater. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 332. Comparative Drama. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 333. Modern Drama. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 371. Acting. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

Dramatic Arts 372. Rehearsal and Performance. Six periods a week 
lor second term. Three credits. 



Mary Washington College 53 



Dramatic Arts 373. Direction and Management. Six periods a week 
for second term. Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 375. Playwriting. Six periods a week for first term 
Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 376. Playwriting. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 377. Playwriting. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 411. Stage Design and Pageantry. Six periods a week 
for first term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Dramatic Arts 412. Scene Construction and Lighting. Six periods a 
week for second term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Dramatic Arts 413. Costume and Make-Up. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Dramatic Arts 420. Children's Theatre. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Speech 

Speech 230. Effective Speech. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Speech 231. Effective Speech. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Speech 232. Effective Spceeh. Six periods a week for first term, 
Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Speech 361. Radio Broadcasting. Six periods a week for first term 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Speech 362. Radio Broadcasting. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Speech 363. Radio Broadcasting. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Speech 421. Public Speaking. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

EDUCATION 

Education 201. Community Relationships. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. 

Education 311-312-313. Elementary Education. Nine periods a week 
for quarter. Nine credits. 

Education 315. Special Education for Exceptional Children. Six pe- 
riods a week for second term. Three credits. 



Note: While not offered in the Department of Education, the fol- 
lowing courses are especially recommended for teachers of the elemen- 
tary grades: Home Economics 311-312-313; Science 381-382-383; Philos- 
ophy 411-412-413; Physical Education 260; Art 315: History 153; 
English 110; Social Science 423; Speech 230. 



54 Mary Washington College 



Education 321-322-323. Secondary Education. Nine periods a week 
for quarter. Nine credits. 

Education 335. Principles of Teaching — Home Economics. Six pe- 
riods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Education 370. Audio- Visual Aids to Learning. Six periods a week 
for first term. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Education 413. Elementary School Management. Six periods a week. 
Offered both terms. Three credits. 

Education 414. Instructional Materials — Elementary Grades. Six 
periods a week. Offered both terms. Three credits. 

Education 415. Guidance. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

Education 416. Co-curricular Activities. Six periods a week for sec- 
ond term. Three credits. 

Education 417. The Curriculum. Six periods a week for first term; 
repeated second term. Three credits. 

Education 440. Supervised Teaching. Two to four periods daily. Six 
to ten credits. Registration must be made in advance. 

PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

Psychology 218. General Psychology. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Psychology 219. General Psychology. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

Psychology 318. Child Psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology 218 
and 219 or the equivalent. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

Psychology 319. Psychology of Adolescence. Prerequisite: Psychol- 
ogy 218 and 219 or the equivalent. Six period a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

Psychology 320. Business Psychology. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Psychology 325. Applied Psychology. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Psychology 332-333. Social Psychology. Six periods a week for first 
and second terms. Three credits each term. 

Psychology 334. Experimental Psychology. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Psychology 335. Psychology of Music. Six periods a week for sec- 
ond term. Three credits. 

Psychology 340. Psychological Problems. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Psychology 341-342. Mental Hygiene. Six periods a week for first 
and second terms. Three credits each term. 



Mary Washington College 55 



Psychology 343. Abnormal Psychology. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Psychology 433. Psychological Measurement. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Philosophy 411-412-413. History and Philosophy of Education. Six 
periods a week for first term; six double periods a week for second 
term. Nine credits. 

Philosophy 415. Ethics. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

Philosophy 416. Introduction to Philosophy. Six periods a week 
for first term. Three credits. 

Philosophy 417. History of Philosophy. Six periods a week for sec- 
ond term. Three credits. 

ENGLISH 

English 110. Children's Literature. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

English 115. Fundamentals. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

English 116. Expository and Descriptive Writing. Prerequisite: 
English 115 or equivalent. Six periods a week for second term. Three 
credits. 

English 117. Composition— Narration and Argumentation. Prerequi- 
sites: English 115-116 or equivalent. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

English 210. Adolescent Literature. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

English 216. Advanced English Grammar. Six periods a week for 
first term .Three credits. 

English 230. Speech Improvement. See Speech 230. 

English 240. Journalism. Five periods a week for first term. Two 
credits. 

English 241. Journalism. Five periods a week for second term. Two 
credits. 

English 261. Survey of English Literature. Prerequisites: English 
115-116-117 or equivalent. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

English 262. Survey of English Literature. Prerequisites: English 
115-116-117-261 or equivalent. Six periods a week for second term. Three 
credits. 

English 263. Survey of American Literature. Prerequisites: English 
115-116-117 or equivalent. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

English 318. English Romantic Poetry. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 



56 Mary Washington College 



English 319. Victorian Poetry. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits, 

English 352. Shakespeare's Comedies. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

English 353. Shakespeare's Tragedies. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

English 354. History of the English Language. Six periods a week 
for first term. Three credits. 

English 355. Biblical Literature. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

English 356. Biblical Literature. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

English 370. Current Literature. Two periods a week for first term. 
Repeated second term. One credit each term. 

English 401. Biography. Six periods a week for second term. Three 
credits. 

English 402. The English Essay. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

English 405. Readings in World Literature. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

English 407. The English Novel. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

English 408. The American Novel. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

English 415. Advanced Composition. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

English 421. Public Speaking. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Library Science 381. Children's Literature. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. 

Library Science 332. Adolescent Literature. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Library Science 333. Book Selection. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

Library Science 391. Reference and Bibliography. Six periods a 
week for first term. Three credits. 

Library Science 392. Teaching the Use of Books and Library. Six 
periods a week for first term. Three credits. 



Mary Washington College 57 



Library Science 393. School Library Administration. Six periods a 
week for second term. Three credits. 

Library Science 395. Cataloguing and Classification. Six periods a 
week for first term. Three credits. 

Library Science 396. Advanced Cataloguing and Classification. Six 
periods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Library Science 397. Supervised Practice. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
Modern Languages 

French 

French B1G1-B102-B103. Fifteen periods a week for the quarter. 
Nine credits. 

French 101-102-103. Prerequisite: Two or three years of French in 
high school or French B101-B102-B103. Nine periods a week for the 
quarter. Nine credits. 

French 201-202-203. Prerequisite: French 101-102-103. Nine periods 

a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

French 301-302-303. Prerequisite: French 201-202-203. Nine periods 
a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

French 401-402-403. Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine 
credits. 

French 405-406-407. Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine 
credits. 

Spanish 

Spanish BI21-B122-B123. Fifteen periods a week for the quarter. 
Nine credits. 

Spanish 121-122-123. Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish 
or B121-B122-.B123. Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Spanish 221-222-223. Prerequisite: Spanish 121-122-123. Nine periods 

a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Spanish 321-322-323. Prerequisite: Spanish 221-222-223. Nine periods 
a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Spanish 421-422-423. Nine periods a week for the quart«r. Nine 
credits. 



58 Mary Washington College 



Portuguese 

Portuguese 141-142-143. Fifteen periods a week for the quarter. 
Nine credits. 

Portuguese 241-242-243. Nine periods a week for the quarter. 
Nine credits. 

German 

German 151-152-153. Fifteen periods a week for the quarter. Nine 
credits. 

Classical Languages 

Greek 

Greek 131-132-133. Elementary Greek. Nine periods a week for the 
quarter. Nine credits. 

Greek 231-232-233. Zenophon, Herodotus, Plato, Homer. Nine pe- 
riods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Latin 

Latin 11-12-13. Fifteen periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Latin 111-112-113. Prerequisite: Two or three units in high-school 
Latin. Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Latin 211-212-213. Prerequisite: Latin 111-112-113 or equivalent. 
Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Latin 311-312-313. Prerequisite: Latin 211-212-213. Nine periods a 
week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Latin 411-412-413. Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Latin 415-416-417. Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

History 

History 151. American History. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

History 152. American History. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

History 153. American History. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

History 221. History of Religions. Six periods a week for first term. 
Repeated second term. Three credits. 

History 251. History of Civilization. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 



Note: Courses in Italian and Russian will be offered if there is 
sufficient demand. 



Mary Washington College 59 



History 262. History of Civilization. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

History 263. History of Civilization. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

History 307. Europe in the Middle Ages. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. 

History 308. The Renaissance. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

History 309. The Reformation. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

History 311. Modern History. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

History 312. Modern History. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

History 313. Modern History. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

History 341. Latin America. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

History 342. Latin America. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

History 343. Latin America. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

History 351. History of Virginia. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

History 352. The Old South. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

History 353. The New South. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

History 380. Current History. Two periods a week for first and 
second terms. One credit each term. Fee, 50 cents. 

History 404. English History to 1558. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

History 405. English History, 1558-1783. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

History 406. English History. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 



Political Science 

Social Science 113. Government. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. 

Social Science 321. Federal Constitution. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Social Science 322. Political Parties. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 



60 Mary Washington College 

Social Science 323. Municipal Government. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Social Science 414. State Government. Six periods a week for second 
term. Three credits. 

Social Science 415. American and European Governments. Six pe- 
riods a week for first term. Three credits. 

Social Science 416. International Relations. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Sociology 

Social Science 411. Pure Sociology. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Social Science 412. Applied Sociology. Six periods a week for sec- 
ond term. Three credits. 

Social Science 413. Social Problems. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Social Science 423. The Family. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. 

Economics 

Social Science 301. Economic History of Europe. Six periods a week 
for first term. Three credits. 

Social Science 302. Economic History of the United States. Six pe- 
riods a week for first term. Three credits. 

Social Science 303. Economic History of the United States. Six pe- 
riods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Social Science 401. Principles of Economics. Six periods a week for 
first term. Three credits. 

Social Science 402. Principles of Economics. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Social Science 403. Principles of Economics. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Geography 

Social Science 115. World Geography. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Social Science 215. Geography of North America. Six periods a 
week for first term. Three credits. 

Social Science 216. Geography of Eurasia. Six periods a week for 
second term. Three credits. 

Social Science 217 or 317. Geography of South America. Six pe- 
riods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Social Science 256. Economic Geography. Six periods a week tor 
second term. Three credits. 

Social Science 315. Conservation of Natural Resources. Six periods 
a week for first term. Three credits. 



Mary Washington College 61 



MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 101-102. General Mathematics. Six periods a week. 
Three credits each term. 

Mathematics 111-112-113. Trigonometry and Algebra. Nine periods 
a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Mathematics 121-122. Business Mathematics. Six periods a week. 
Three credits each term. 

Mathematics 211-212-213. Analytic Geometry. Nine periods a week 
for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Mathematics 223. College Geometry. Six periods a week for first 
term. Three credits. 

Mathematics 311-312-313. Calculus. Nine periods a week for quar- 
ter. Nine credits. 

Mathematics 323. Statistics. Prerequisite: Two quarters of mathe- 
matics. Six periods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Mathematics 325. Astronomy, Maps, and Weather. Six periods a 
week for first term. Three credits. 

Mathematics 411-412-413. Advanced Algebra and Advanced Cal- 
culus. Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Mathematics 425. General Astronomy. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
325. Six periods a week for second term. Three credits. 

MUSIC 

Music 101-102-103. School Music. Six periods a week for the quar- 
ter. Six credits. Fee, $6.00. 

Piano. One period of class work and one-half hour individual les- 
son a week during the first and second terms. One-half of a credit each 
term or one credit for the quarter. An extra charge of $10.50 a term is 
made for this course, distributed as follows: piano tuition, $9.00; piano 
practice fee, $1.50. 

Voice. Individual voice training. Participation in recitals is neces- 
sary for credit, and every student of voice is expected to be a member 
of the Choral Club. One-half hour individual lesson a week. Offered 
first and second terms. One-half of a credit each term or one credit for 
the quarter. An extra charge of $9.00 a term is made for this course, 
plus $1.50 for use of piano. 

Music 111. Survey of Music. Six periods a week for first term. 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Music 112. Survey of Music. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Music 113. Survey of Music. Six periods a week for second term. 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Music 121. Singing. Four periods a week for first term. Two credits. 

Music 122. Class Piano. Four periods a week for first term. Two 
credits. Fee, $3.00. 



62 Mary Washington College 



Music 123. Class Piano. Four periods a week for second term. Two 
credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Music 171-172. Instrumental Music — Band or Orchestra. Five dou- 
ble periods a week. Offered both terms. Two credits each term. Fee 
for use of instruments, $3.00 per term. 

Music 181-182-183. Sight Singing. Six periods a week for the quar- 
ter. Three credits. 

Music 191-192-193. Harmony. Nine periods a week for the quarter. 
Nine credits. 

Music 210. Music Appreciation, (Open to students in Cur. Ill and 
VI only; not open to students with credit for Music 111-112-113.) Six 
periods a week. Offered both terms. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Music 281-282-283. Ear Training. Six periods a week for the quar- 
ter. Three credits. 

Music 291-292-293. Harmony. Prerequisite: Music 191-192-193. 
Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Music 301-302-303. School Music. Prerequisite: Music 101-102-103. 
Nine periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. 

Music 311-312-313. Survey of Materials. Three periods a week for 
the quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Music 321-322-323. Conducting. Three periods a week for the quar- 
ter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Music 374-375-376. Orchestral Instruments. Six periods a week for 
the quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Music 381-382-383. Ear Training. Prerequisite: Music 281-282-283. 
Six periods a week for the quarter. Three credits. 

Music 384-385-385. Diction in Singing. Six periods a week for the 
quarter. Three credits. 

Music 391. Counterpoint. Six periods a week for first term. Three 
credits. 

Music 392-393. Form and Analysis. Six periods a week for the quar- 
ter. Six credits. 

Music 401-402-403. History of Music. Six periods a week for the 
quarter. Six credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Music 411-412-413. Composition. Six periods a week for the quar- 
ter. Six credits. 

Music 421-422-423. Music of the Church. Six periods a week for 
the quarter. Six credits. Fee, $6.00. 

Music 474-475-476. Orchestration. Six periods a week for the quar- 
ter. Six credits. Fee, $6.00. 

Choral Club. One two-hour period a week for the quarter. One-half 
credit each term. 



Mary Washington College 63 



PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION 

Health Education 100. Hygiene. Six periods a week for first term. 
Repeated second term. Three credits. 

Physical Education 115. Beginners Swimming. Six periods a week 
for first term. Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $3.00. 

Physical Education 120. Fundamentals of Rhythmic Activities. Six 
periods a week for first term. One credit. 

Physical Education 130. Games. Six periods a week for second term. 
One credit. 

Physical Education 150. Self Testing Activities. Six periods a week 
for second term. One credit. 

♦Physical Education 171. Beginners Equitation. Two double periods 
a week for first term. Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $15.00.f 

Physical Education 181-182. Modernistic Ballet. Two double periods 
a week for the quarter. One credit. Fee, $18.00 per quarter. 

Physical Education 211. First Aid and Safety Education. Six periods 
a week for first term. Repeated second term. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Physical Education 215. Intermediate Swimming. Six periods a 
week for first term. Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $3.00. 

Physical Education 233. Campcraft. Four double periods a week for 
first term Repeated second term. Two credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 236. Leadership in Community Recreation. Four 
periods a week for first term. Repeated second term. Two credits. 

Physical Education 237. Social Sports. Six periods a week for first 
term. One credit. 

Physical Education 240. Fundamentals of Body Balance and Move- 
ment. Six periods a week for first term. One credit. 

Physical Education 241. Beginners Softball. Six periods a week for 
second term. One credit. 

Physical Education 242. Beginners Basketball. Six periods a week 
for first term. One credit. 

Physical Education 243. Beginners Modem Dance. Six periods a 
week for first term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 244. Folk and National Dances. Prerequisite: 
Fundamentals of Rhythmic Activities. Six periods a week for second 
term. One credit. 

Physical Education 245. Golf Six periods a week for first term. 
Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 246. Beginners Field Hockey. Six periods a 
week for second term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 247. Beginners Soccer and Speedball. Six pe- 
riods a week for first term. One credit. 

* Permission of parent or guardian must be presented in writing before enrollment in 
this course may be completed. 

♦Riding for recreation, without credit, one hour a week a term. Pee, $5.00. Two 
hours a week: fee, $10.00. 



64 Mary Washington College 



Physical Education 248. Archery. Six periods a week for first term. 
Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 249. Tennis. Six periods a week for first term. 
Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 250. Social Dancing. Six periods a week for first 
term. Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 260. Physical Education for Elementary Grades. 
Six periods a week for first term. Three credits. 

♦Physical Education 271. Intermediate Equitation. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 171 or permission of instructor. Two double periods 
a week for first term. Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $15 % 00.t 

Physical Education 315. Advanced Swimming. Six periods a week 
for second term. One credit. Fee. $2.00. 

Physical Education 325-326-327. Coaching Physical Education. Six 
periods a week for the quarter. Six credits. 

Physical Education 342. Intermediate Basketball. Six periods a 
week for first term. One credit. 

Physical Education 343. Intermediate Modern Dance. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 243. Six periods a week for second term. One credit. 
Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 344. Tap Dancing. Prerequisite: Physical Edu- 
cation 120. Six periods a week for first term. One credit. Fee, $1.00. 

Physical Education 345. Intermediate Golf. Prerequisite: Physical 
Education 245 or its equivalent. Six periods a week for second term. 
One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 348. Intermediate Archery. Prerequisite: Phys- 
ical Education 248 or its equivalent. Six periods a week for second 
term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 349. Intermediate Tennis. Prerequisite: Physical 
Education 249 or its equivalent. Six periods a week for second term. 
One credit. Fee, $1.00. 

♦Physical Education 371. Advanced Equitation. Prerequisite: Phys- 
ical Education 271 or permission of the instructor. Two double periods 
a week for first term. Repeated second term. One credit. Fee, $15.00.f 

Physical Education 412. Postural Deviations. Prerequisite: Physical 
Education 413. Ten periods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Physical Education 413. Body Mechanics. Prerequisite: Biology 337 
and 338. Six periods a week for first term. Three credits. 

Physical Education 414. Applied Physiology. Prerequisite: Biology 
373. Six periods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Physical Education 415. Life Saving. Eight periods a week for first 
term. Two credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 421-422-423. Officiating and Coaching. Nine pe- 
riods a week for the quarter. Three credits. 

* Permission of parent or guardian must be presented in writing before enrollment in 
this course may be completed. 

trading for recreation, without credit, one hour a week a tenn. Fee, $5.00. Two 
hours a week: fee, $10.00. 



Mary Washington College 65 



Physical Education 431. History of Physical Education. Four pe- 
riods -a week for first term. Two credits. 

Physical Education 432. Procedures in Physical Education. Six pe- 
riods a week for second term. Three credits. 

Physical Education 443. Advanced Modern Dance. Six periods a 
week for second term. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 



SCIENCE 



Biology 

Biology 121. General Biology. Three double and three single periods 
a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 122. General Biology. Three double and three single periods 
a week for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 123. General Biology. Three double and three single periods 
a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 337-338. Human Anatomy. Six periods a week for first and 
second terms. Three credits each term. Fee, $3.00 each term. 

Biology 341. Field Zoology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123. Four 
single and two double periods a week, plus field trips. Offered second 
term. Three credits. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Biology 342. Bacteriology. Two single and two double periods a 
week for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 343. Heredity and Eugenics. Two single and four double 
periods a week for second term. Three credits. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Biology 353. Field Botany. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123, Two 
single and four double periods a week for first term. Three credits. 
Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 373. Physiology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123. Two 
double and four single periods a week for first term. Three credits. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 211-212-213. Inorganic Chemistry. Three double and six 
single periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. Fee, $9.00. Con- 
tingent deposit, $2.00. 

Chemistry 301-302-303. Qualitative Analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
211-212-213 or equivalent. Three single and six double periods a week 
for the quarter. Nine credits. Fee, $9.00. Contingent deposit, $2,00, 



66 Mary Washington College 



Chemistry 311-312-313. Organic and Biological Chemistry. Three 
double and six single periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. Fee, 
$9.00. Contingent deposit, $2.00. 

Chemistry 431-432-433. Quantitative Analysis. Three single and six 
double periods a week for the quarter. Nine credits. Fee, $9.00. Con- 
tingent deposit, $2.00. 

Physics 



Physics 401-402-403. Three double and six single periods a week for 
the quarter. Nine credits. Fee, $9.00. Contingent fee, $2.00. 



Science 

Science 340. Introduction to Geology. Two double and four single 
periods a week, plus field trips. Offered first term. Three credits. 

* Science 381. Environmental Science. Two double and four single 
periods a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. Contingent de- 
posit, $2.00. 

*Science 382. Environmental Science. Two double and four single 
periods a week for second term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. Contingent 
deposit, $2.00. 

*Science 383. Environmental Science. Two double and four single 
periods a week for first term. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. Contingent de- 
posit, $2.00. 



'Note: Not credited toward major or minor in science 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

Return to Office of the Registrar 

Date . _ 194 

I hereby apply for admission to Mary Washington College, summer 
session 194 (Check) First Term Q Second Term □ Both Terms Q 

Name Age_ — . 

Street Address __ 



City- _____ . State. 



Is a transcript of your work on file at this college? . If not, 

and you wish us to write for transcript, please give necessary names 

and addresses. 



Give name and address of high school from which you graduated if you 
have not had any college work— _, . _ _ 



Do you wish dormitory room reserved? ... . State preference 

in regard to room or rr%nmmntf> 



Note: Summer School Students who expect to return for the fall quar- 
ter beginning September 19, 1944, must secure and fill out the regular 
application blank and pay room reservation fee by May 1. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

Trunks are not permitted in students* rooms or corridors, 
but must be stored in a trunk room. 

Taxi Service. — Students who arrive by rail or bus can se- 
cure taxi service from the railway station to the college at a 
very small charge. 

Room Assignments.— Students upon arrival at the college 
should report to the Dean of Women, Virginia Hall, for room 
assignments. 

Registration. — Full instructions in regard to registration, 
assignment of classes, etc., will be posted in the halls. Students 
will receive a printed schedule of classes upon matriculation. 



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shaft marks the burial place of the mother of George Washington 
and serves as a constant and impressive tribute to high ideals and 
noble womanhood. 



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